Category Archives: Psychology

Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man by Mary L. Trump

Reviewed by Nancy Eaton

Whenever we read a book like this, we wonder if the work was written just for the money or for a reason like revenge. It would have to take a lot of convincing to make readers believe Mary Trump was not writing the book for either of these reasons.

Mary Trump has written a book about her uncle, Donald Trump. Her father, Fred, was the oldest of the Trump sons but no matter what he did, it just didn’t please his father, Fred Trump, Sr. His father always favored Donald and Fred instilled into Donald that losing was a sign of weakness.

As a child, Mary Trump spent a great amount of time at her grandparents’ house. It is here that she observed Donald and his siblings. Mary tells us of the many holiday get- togethers and some funny things that happened at these events.

We have to agree that Mary Trump does have the professional credentials to write a book to try and explain some of her uncle’s behavior. And she also has first hand knowledge of the family.

This is a well-written book and Mary Trump makes many points that will make the reader ponder her thoughts. The main question is does she do a good job of convincing readers that what she is saying is true? I must admit she convinced me. When you read her words and then look at the way her uncle has acted throughout his presidency, it is my opinion that she has written a credible book.

The Five Paths to Happiness: The Keys to Living a Happy Life According to Your Personality by Javier Ramon Brito

Reviewed by Timea Barabas

The Five Paths to HappinessThe search for happiness is a central theme in our life paths; it seems to be the goal of mankind. Although many view it as a destination some, like Javier Ramon Brito, are here to remind us that it is in fact all about the road. In his book, The Five Paths to Happiness, he describes several means of materializing such an elusive concept.

Click Here for More Information on The Five Paths to Happiness

Unlike other self-help books which usually put forward a single universal solution, this one presents five ways, adding a layer of complexity to the approach. The author combines different disciplines and thought systems based on a common denominator (the number five) to outline his personal system. From psychology he takes the character structures, the five elements that govern everything (ether, air, fire, water, earth) from Eastern philosophy, also studying the interaction of these elements with the human body from the perspective of traditional Chinese medicine.