Category Archives: Horror

The Nosferatu Conspiracy: Book Two, The Sommelier by Brian James Gage

Reviewed by Dianne Woodman

The Sommelier is the second book in The Nosferatu Conspiracy series by Brian James Gage. A synopsis of the first book, The Sleepwalker, provides an excellent framework for readers in this riveting, chilling, and hair-raising tale that is both unsettling and addictive.

German Emperor Kaiser Wilhelm II, the ruler of the Prussian Empire, is working toward world domination and searching for the bottle of Vlad Dracula’s blood so that he and his mistress can achieve immortality and conceive a superior and untouchable child personified by evil. Augusta, Wilhelm’s wife, has stooped to devious measures in the hopes of stopping the mistress from becoming her successor.

Horde (Zombie Apocalypse: The Chad Halverson Book 6) by Bryan Cassiday

Reviewed by Daniel Ryan Johnson

Horde is clearly a product of the times. It’s a zombie apocalypse book written with a heavy influence from the COVID-19 pandemic. With people worried about things like face masks, quarantining, and social distancing, the zombie apocalypse sounds like an event with which we are all too familiar.

Bryan Cassiday takes on the oft overplayed zombie apocalypse novel. However, he mixes in current events to give the zombie tale a unique twist. He combines everything that this last year brought us. Most of the novel takes place in an encampment in Arizona, where mistrust runs high. The camp is filled with confusion regarding the nature of the plague. There is much debate on whether the zombie plague can be transmitted through spores released through the breath of zombies and if there are symptomless human carriers of the disease.

Horde does not limit its scope of yearly commentary to pandemic-related affairs, however. There is also a president who seems to be losing his grip on reality as he declares himself president for life and begins to nuke cities across the United States in an attempt to limit the spread of the virus. Not to mention, an attempted overthrow of the government by a group of armed vigilantes.

The Nosferatu Conspiracy: The Sleepwalker by Brian James Gage

Reviewed by Dianne Woodman

The Nosferatu Conspiracy: The Sleepwalker is the first book in a new series that takes place in both Romania and Saint Petersburg, Russia. Brian James Gage has written a gripping, edge-of-your-seat supernatural thriller with his own interpretation of Russian history involving Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin and the Russian Imperial Romanov family during the reign of Tsar Nicholas Aleksandrovich Romanov II. Rasputin, a powerful and deceptive vampire with extraordinary, otherworldly abilities, has orchestrated an elaborate scheme that will enable vampires to rule the world and use the human population as a food source. Members of the Romanov family are crucial to the success of Rasputin’s game plan. Vampire hunters with special weapons are trying to thwart Rasputin’s efforts in his promise of victory for bloodsucking evil beings to triumph over humankind. The hunters face a time-constraint for trying to put a stop to this calamitous undertaking. Who will be the victor? Will humans serve as vampires’ food supply or will humans destroy any chance of vampires running rampant?

Who’s There?: A Collection of Stories by Dimas Rio

Reviewed by Lisa Brown-Gilbert

Offering horror fans a literate concoction of brief yet creatively posed stories woven with a supernatural bent throughout, Who’s There? by author Dimas Rio does well to stimulate the imagination with his collection of Asian culture-centric, eclectic shorts each sure to pique the interest as well as tingle the spine.

Firstly, Author Dimas beguiles the reader with solid storytelling with the title story, Who’s There? which is also my personal favorite. This well-honed tale brings the reader along on a creepy journey through the guilt-ridden conscience of an alcoholic, drug-addicted and particularly egocentric man whose dark psyche leads him into the cold wet embrace of his fiancé.

Continuing the chills is story 2, titled At Dusk within which a high school magazine reporter embarks on an assignment to interview a celebrity mystery writer who shares the ultimate ghost story to his captive, and earnest yet unsuspecting audience of one.

Gretchen: A Thriller by Shannon Kirk

Reviewed by Jim Eaton

At first, I had no idea what to make of this book. It seems in some sub-textual way to be a sort of treatise on coincidence (dare I say, a puzzle within a puzzle). I wasn’t sure to what degree the supernatural was going to play a role; I myself had never heard of any human being (outside of fantasy and sci-fi) having violet eyes. So I suppose you could say this book kept me very much off balance from the start. And it probably isn’t the sort of story I would typically read. Was it a thriller? A mystery? A puzzle in puzzle wrapped in coincidences? It took me more than a few chapters to try to hone in.

How to describe the book without betraying its plot? Hm. You’ve got a woman and a daughter on the run, moving from state to state, hiding from…we don’t know what. The mother won’t tell the daughter. But we do know this has been going on for about thirteen years, since the girl (Lucy) was two years old. I found it ever so slightly confusing that the mother would be worried about them being recognized if in fact the girl was two when they’d fled…but I surmised that the uniquely of the eyes was the root of the paranoia. Maybe. Maybe they were aliens or witches. You decide.

Walking the Dead by Heather Graham

Reviewed by Allen Hott

Walking the DeadThis starts in Switzerland in 1816 when a group of well-known artists gather at the castle of a friend. It is to be a sociable, maybe some working, time for folks like Percy Shelley, Lord Byron, and Claire Godwin. Henry Hubert was the host and at the end of the little get-together he announces that he too is an artist. He also announces that he is going to begin “painting with blood” to hopefully cover much of the dark despair of the castle.

Click Here for More Information on Walking the Dead

The story then moves to the present day and is basically located in New Orleans where a family has been found slain. It was a man, his wife, her mother, father, and her aunt. They are strewn through the house and appear to be stabbed and sliced up with a knife and possibly a sword.

Voodoo Child, Book One: Zombie Uprising by William Burke

Reviewed by Chris Phillips

Voodoo ChildAround the globe and then landing in a small Caribbean island, this story traverses the world and more.

The action starts on the small island of Isle De Fantomas. It moves to the deserts of the Middle East and then back again. The plot is an interesting mix of horror, mystery and voodoo. The most intriguing part of this to this reviewer is the author’s respect for a small religion, voodoo, in this case.

Click Here for More Information on Voodoo Child, Book One: Zombie Uprising

Yes, there are demons, devils, voodoo priestesses and hordes of the undead. They fill the pages and bring out a very mixed bag of horror and yet detailed practice of a little known religion. There are soldiers, military and mercenary troops and wickedly charming scientists and others not nearly so charming.

The Fireman: A Novel by Joe Hill

Reviewed by Lisa Brown-Gilbert

The FiremanBestselling author Joe Hill literally sets the world of horror fiction on fire with his take on the human condition as it subsists in the horrifyingly ravaged post-apocalyptic world, of his newest novel, The Fireman.

Click Here for More Information on The Fireman

Author Hill poses a vastly complex and alarming world, where a pervasively virulent spore somehow spreads between human carriers who ultimately die in one of the most brutal of ways, via human combustion. Seemingly indiscriminate, combustion can occur at any given time and without warning people die where they stand or lay, exploding into flames. Called Dragonscale because of its ominous, but decorative dragon scaled appearance on the infected, the spread of the vicious spore takes humanity to the brink of extinction, leaving those left trying to survive in an uncertain world swimming in fiery violence and drowning in ashes.

End Matter by Ezekiel Cartwright

Reviewed by Teri Davis

endmatter“These stories must never make it to paperback. I don’t want them edited, and they must never change from their existing format. They’re written this way for a reason, and…”

For More Information on End Matter, Click Here.

The stereotypical author is introverted, creative, and extremely analytical. These attributes lead greatly assist them in examining and writing about the world around them, whether real or only in their imagination.

Nathan Cartwright fits this description. Living alone in Maine, he is very reclusive to the point of being almost a hermit. His only contact with the real world is through his son, Danny and his granddaughter.

Nathan has an advantage though over most authors. The major publishing houses want his writings, but he refuses to work with each of them, choosing to have his work strictly available through self-publishing only. He tried to write romance and even drama novels with little success, but his magic touch was the thriller. Why?

Nathan is facing the reality of his life ending. His physician has informed him that his days are numbered. Now is the time for him to do one final good deed.

His son needed money for his wife’s cancer treatment. Between the medical costs and raising a daughter, Nathan feels obligated to help with the family needs with money.
He is returning to being a successful writer of thriller novels. His books almost have a magical authenticity to them with so much explicit gore that he given the nickname, “Grisly Grandpa.”

Nathan now wants to publish a book that will secure Danny’s financial needs and those of his granddaughter.

With finally completing the latest novel on his tablet, Nathan meets with his illustrator at a nearby coffee shop that will change all of his plans.

It all begins with a server who eventually recognizes him. Who could predict how this would send his life into a downward spiral?

The author, Ezekiel Cartwright propels his interests into his writing while being influenced by his childhood in New England and writers such as Stephen King, HP Lovecraft, and Dean Koontz.

This novella is tightly wound into an introspective tale around the theme of striving for greatness while being aware of the impending cost of responsibility in that achievement. With realistically flawed characters striving for hope and a better life, the reader views the world through Nathan with his daily frustrations and challenges.

End Matter is a different novella with a unique authenticity that is a frightening page-turner.

Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances by Neil Gaiman

Reviewed by Ronnie Alvarado

There are few writers in the modern fantasy canon whose style is as definitive and whose prose is as magically transcendent as Neil Gaiman. For the last two decades, he has been delighting readers with his witty, chilling, and at times downright frightening stories. His latest work, Trigger Warnings: Short Fictions and Disturbances, does not disappoint, as its brims with fantastical tales of varying lengths and plots.