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BOOK REVIEW: THE RUN
BY STUART WOODS

We hope you enjoy this book review by Allen Hott.



Stuart Woods puts together a good in-depth view of how a presidential campaign evolves and what all can happen as it does. The Run follows the track that a senator from Georgia takes as he works his way along the route to the White House. Medical problems that befall both the president and vice president have somewhat put the upcoming presidential campaign in to somewhat of a quandary. However only the insiders are aware of those problems so the Democratic Party is working hard to keep them unknown to the general public. The party is divided between two potential candidates for president and the battle between them is heated all the way up to the convention.

William Henry Lee IV has worked his way up through the Democratic ranks to become one of the most influential Senators in Washington in a very short period. His style that is not necessarily truly political has won him many friends and as usual a good supply of enemies. Unlike many politicians Lee works hard with those on both sides of the aisle and has built a well know reputation for being fair and above board with his constituents and the American people in general.

George Kiel, Lee’s opponent, has held more important senatorial positions and is much better known. In the opinion of most Kiel stands a better chance of winning in the eventual race against the Republican candidate. However there are many stops along the trail and Lee makes the most of his opportunities.

A happening early in Lee’s career that involved a defense he provided for a killer who is on death row comes up and stands to be harmful to his position. Coupled with that is the fact that at the end of the trial Lee had a fling with a woman who has now become a movie star. Even though they were both unmarried at the time her connection with the killer causes Lee problems as he continues his quest.

There is also the reappearance of a white supremacy group that had tried early in Lee’s career to assassinate him. They failed but several of their group still harbors resentment and the leader of the group is constantly looking for another opening to do away with their enemy. Several times he almost succeeds.

Wood’s has put together a great story with many subplots that all together make up a believable picture of politics on a national level. He also writes in a very simple manner without long periods of description. By the use of well-written dialogue interspersed with the story line he keeps the reader’s attention all the way to the end.

REVIEWED BY ALLEN HOTT

DO NOT REPRINT WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE REVIEWER, ALLEN HOTT


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