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                                        BOOK REVIEW

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MURDER AT THE WASHINGTON TRIBUNE
                    MARGARET TRUMAN

"Oh, what a tangled web we weave/when first we practice to deceive" Sir Walter Scott

The book Murder At the Washington Tribune is a story of a very tangled web of deceit, half-truths and outright lies.  Joe Wilcox is reporter on the Washington Tribune.  He has a solid reputation for being a good reporter.  He has never resorted to what is generally referred to as tabloid journalism.  His reputation has gained him support within the police department and one policewoman Edith Vargas-Swayze has always cooperated with Joe and given him any leads that she possibly could.

Joe's daughter Roberta works for a local TV station and just received an award for Best Local Investigative Reporting.  Joe and his wife Georgia are very proud of their daughter and content with their life and each other.  Or at least Georgia is content.  Joe is beginning to feel his age and watching the young reporters coming into the paper with all their enthusiasm is making him feel inadequate.

Jean Kaporis was a beautiful young woman working at the Tribune and had recently been murdered one evening while working.  Joe was at a dead-end on the story and was being pushed by his superiors to come up with something new.  Then Colleen McNamara, another pretty young woman, was found murdered in the park.  Joe visits the McNamara family and drops a hint that there might be a serial killer in Washington.  Then he decides to go ahead and write a story along those lines.

The lie escalates from there.  Joe is hiding the truth from his daughter regarding the serial killer item.  He is refusing to name his source for the information even to his good friend Edith.

To really tangle the web Joe's brother Michael turns up in Washington, DC.  Michael has spent the last forty years in a mental institution.  When he was a young man he murdered a neighbor girl and sentenced to a mental hospital.  Georgia is aware of Michael's existence but Roberta does not even know she has an uncle.

Then there is a third murder and this time it is a man and Michael's neighbor.

This is a complicated story and as you read it won't be an easy task to figure out the guilty party.  The ending surprised me.

This is the first Margaret Truman book I have read but I do intend to read more of her books.

REVIEWED BY PATRICIA E. REID

DO NOT REPRINT WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE REVIEWER, PATRICIA E. REID

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