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BOOK REVIEW: BRISINGR
BY CHRISTOPHER PAOLINI

We hope you enjoy this book review by The Bookworm.



Oaths sworn… Loyalties tested… Forces collide…

Eragon and Saphira are the Empire’s #1 enemy. Galbatorix is set on capturing them and making them his. Murtagh and his dragon, Thorn, are sent to subdue them while Galbatorix sends out hordes of painless soldiers to become a constant threat to the Varden. The once farm boy, Eragon, is the Varden’s only hope, but he still risks his life and the Varden’s victory to fulfill his oaths. Eragon and Saphira know they have no hope for surviving a battle with Galbatorix face to face, unless they get stronger. The heavy tolls of battle are creating unrest in the soldiers and the situations are becoming dire. The Varden are constantly needing and wielding Eragon’s status and strength to influence matters. The continual stress of battle, affecting political events with his eminence in Nasuada’s place, and knowing that they are The Varden’s only hope for victory, is really starting to wear on Eragon. Eragon and Saphira are forced to make choices, choices that may lead to victory… or defeat.

It was quite evident that Brisingr is just preparing us for the next and final book in the cycle.

I believe, Christopher Paolini was mainly tying up many lose ends and making his characters become people. Lose ends, such as fixing Elva’s curse, what happened to Sloan, and etc., which were formed from the first two books were wrapped up with interesting, unexpected, sometimes funny, effective ways. I admit that I am not a fan of Nasuada or Oromis. They each have a couple traits that annoy me, but Brisingr changed my harsh dislike of them. I began to understand them, and their ways and reasons; not only them or main characters, but also other minor characters like Roran, Jormundur, Angela, and more.

In the first two books, the world of Alagaesia seemed far off and unreachable; unreal. In Brisingr, Alagaesia became a place with people, not just a land with characters.

The dialogue is one aspect of the cycle that could do a little refining. The various odd, foreign languages and a mix of formal, medieval dialogue and modern slang were all intertwined. Though these different forms/styles of speech don’t mesh, the text was still enjoyable and scrutable.

The characters’ bantering and reasonable arguments added a nice coat of intelligence and logic to this book. The Inheritance Cycle if full of adrenaline pumping moments, sweet/caring moments, restful “ I can take a bathroom break now” moments, embarrassing “ I can’t believe he said that” moments, intriguing thoughtful moments, but there is rarely just a raw logical, why didn’t I think of that moment. Brisingr had them all.

Brisingr has well prepared us for the upcoming conclusion to the cycle..

REVIEWED BY THE BOOKWORM

DO NOT REPRINT WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE REVIEWER, THE BOOKWORM (NOTE: THE BOOKWORM IS ONE OF OUR YOUNG ADULT REVIEWERS).


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