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BOOK REVIEW: THE CLINCH KNOT
BY JOHN GALLIGAN

We hope you enjoy this book review by Caryn St. Clair.



Ned “Dog” Oglivie's life is fly fishing. He's left his home in Massachusetts and set out in his camper for the wilds of Montana to fish where he befriends a young interracial couple. He was about to leave them and move on when a couple of skinheads come to their camp and burn the couple's tent and vandalize Dog's camper. The local sheriff seems less than eager to look into the matter and urges Dog to leave town. Dog does not.

The book is really a couple of stories rolled into one. On the surface, it's the newest adventure of Dog, seen previously in The Nail Knot and The Blood Knot. One of Dog's friends is murdered and the other friend is accused of the crime. Dog investigates when the sheriff doesn't. It's also a social commentary on the evil that can exist in even the smallest towns. Livingston, Montana is a sportsman's paradise. Who would expect to encounter the hatred of skinheads in such a place? Who would expect the sheriff to ignore their crimes? Obviously there is much more going on in Livingston below the surface.

Set against the backdrop of fly fishing, author Galligan offers readers a philosophical look into the motivation behind the characters' actions. Using a series of fly fishing analogies, (“what you've hooked goes beyond your comprehension”) Galligan lets readers get a sense of what the sheriff is up against.

For the most part, the use of the fly fishing analogies work. The book teeters on the line between being an enjoyable read and a bit “preachy” during the long passages comparing fly fishing to life. That said, readers that like a little more to think about with their mysteries will find The Clinch Knot an excellent choice.

REVIEWED BY CARYN ST. CLAIR

DO NOT REPRINT WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE REVIEWER, CARYN ST. CLAIR


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