FEATURED AT BESTSELLERSWORLD.COM

Corn, Cotton and Chocolate: How the Maya Changed the World

Corn, Cotton and Chocolate: How the Maya Changed the World by James O’Kon PE

To purchase this book click on the link below: Amazon.com Read Our Review More »

Stainer

Stainer: A Novel of the ‘Me Decade’ by Iolanthe Woulff

To purchase this book click on the link below: Amazon.com Read Our Review More »

No Surrender: Faith, Family and Finding Your Way by Patrick Bisher with Jon Land

To purchase this book click on the link below: Amazon.com Read Our Review More »

Timeless Travels

Timeless Travels: Tales of Mystery, Intrigue, Humor, and Enchantment by Joseph Rotenberg

To purchase this book click on the link below: Author’s Website Read the Synopsis for Timeless Travels More »

Mock My Words

Mock My Words by Chandra Shekhar

To purchase this book click on the link below: Amazon.com Read Our Review More »

The Good Daughter: A Novel by Karin Slaughter

Reviewed by Mark Moderson

The Good DaughterKarin Slaughter delivers another home run with The Good Daughter.

This fast paced mystery is a page turner that starts quickly introducing us to the Quinn family who suffer unimaginable violence. Flash forward 28 years and the family again is in the middle of violence in their hometown. You can’t help but want to root for Charlotte and Samantha Quinn as they battle back from the loss of their mother and the harm done to themselves.

Sisters in Crime/Los Angeles Presents LAst Resort by Matt Coyle, Mary Marks, Patricia Smiley and Michael Connelly (Introduction)

Reviewed by Lisa Brown-Gilbert

Last ResortSince 1997, Sisters in Crime has published anthologies of members’ crime fiction works. Each collection was well received with their newest addition, The LAst Resort as no exception. A stunningly extraordinary collection of fiction shorts, the book overall, combines elements that make for a deliciously wicked elixir of potently intriguing portrayals of lives at their last resort, near drowning, immersed in the murky waters of the underbelly of morality that thrives in Los Angeles.

Death at an English Wedding (Murder on Location) (Volume 7) by Sara Rosett

Reviewed by Caryn St. Clair

Death at an English WeddingDeath at an English Wedding finds Americans Kate and Alex, the location scouts scouting for a venue for their own wedding. Well, not really, as when the book opens they have all of the details for their wedding secured, which is good since their wedding is a mere three weeks away. For people “in the business,” it would seem logical that all would run smoothly, but family has a way of complicating things and both Alex and Kate have some doozies for family members.

The first complication surfaces when Kate picks up her mother at the airport. Always a bit flighty and unpredictable, her mother is sketchy on details as to whom the younger man is that Kate saw her with in the coffee shop. Her mom brushes the incident off as nothing but fellow passengers chatting after their flight, but Kate knowing her mother well, knows there is more to the conversation than that. It is a few chapters later before the details start to come out and, as one might expect, none if of those details are good.

Al Franken, Giant of the Senate by Al Franken

Reviewed by Teri Davis

Giant of the SenateSenator Al Franken of Minnesota has quickly become one of the most well-known U.S. Senators of the United States of America.

Giant of the Senate is an autobiography of Al Franken beginning his journey as a child growing up in Minnesota, to becoming a writer of Saturday Night Live and finally becoming a respected Democratic U.S. Senator.
“Here in America, of course, we’re all immigrants. Except, of course, for Native Americans against whom we committed genocide.” With the present political leadership in Washington, this quote is gutsy. Remember, he is a democrat.

Who could imagine a comedy writer being the unlikely Democratic candidate for a congressional seat?

Being a child of typical middle-class America from the liberal state of Minnesota gives a young Al Franken a strong, independent foundation for his future life choices. When his older brother became the first in the family eventually graduating from MIT with a degree in physics, Al made his own way by attending Harvard. Surprising, his brother became a photographer and Al, a comedian. How would your parents feel about those outcomes from a college education?

A Shimmer of Hummingbirds: A Birder Murder Mystery by Steve Burrows

Reviewed by Caryn St. Clair

A Shimmer of HummingbirdsDetective Chief JeJeune is one of the most unusual protagonists I have run across in my reading. Canadian by birth, he fled Canada amid a family scandal which continues to threaten his new life in Norfolk, England. Jejuene, besides being a Detective Chief is also an avid birder giving these books an interesting twist. Though filled with birds, birding terms and bird facts, these are not the cozies one might expect. Make no mistake, the Domenic Jejuene books are police procedurals.

There are three main threads interwoven in A Shimmer of Hummingbirds. Jejuene has planned a birding trip to Colombia to capture as many of the varieties of native hummingbirds as he can for his life list. He also has every intention of doing a little nosing around to see if he can find out more about the legal problems his brother is facing. His superior is well aware JeJuene’s real purpose in the trip, but realizes that nothing she says will change his mind. So off Jejeune goes on his South American adventure while back home Norfolk life continues. Marvin Laraby, JeJuene’s former boss has been named JeJeune’s temporary replacement. The two men did not part on friendly terms so those who worked under Jejuene are at a loss as to how much to share with JeJeune when he calls in. When JeJuene hears of an apparent accident which injures Lindy, JeJuene’s love interest, he asks one of his colleagues to on the sly look into a particular criminal that he and Laraby helped put away. Lastly, a woman is found murdered in her home. All of the evidence points to the motive as something to do with an offer on a project involving drones and reforestation.

Burrows seems to have some environmental twist in some part of the plots in each of his books. This one has two. The obvious one is the need for there to be reforestation in England and the second concerns the natives of Colombia being put at risk by tourists and specifically birders. He includes some notes at the end concerning the second.

The Girl on the Bridge: A McCabe and Savage Thriller (McCabe and Savage Thrillers) by James Hayman

Reviewed by Vickie Daley

The Girl on the BridgeThe Girl on the Bridge is the 5th offering in the McCabe and Savage thriller series. It is certainly a stand-alone and you can feel confident that you didn’t miss anything with the other four. I would certainly give them a try.

There is a prologue that gives you background on both The Girl on The Bridge and her boyfriend who attended a frat rush party where the girl is gang raped. Hannah is talked out of pursuing prosecution of the perpetrators as she only knew two and had waited too long to come forward. Sixteen years later she commits suicide by jumping off a bridge. The main rapist and a buddy, who shows up dead, are soon the victims of the current investigation as McCabe & Savage try to find out who killed the buddy and who kidnapped Josh Thorne.

She Rides Shotgun: A Novel by Jordan Harper (Review #2)

Reviewed by Lisa Brown-Gilbert

She Rides ShotgunFrom the first sentence in Jordan Harper’s thrilling fiction debut, She Rides Shotgun, you find yourself a willing captive held fast by his audaciously gritty narrative which centers on the corrupted coming of age of young Polly McClusky, an innocent, thrust into the seamy side of life where criminal elements heartily dwell.

The day estranged dad and convict, Nate McClusky reappeared in eleven-year-old daughter Polly’s life, and it was effectively forever changed. Fresh out of jail, Nate didn’t bring candy and gifts like other fathers might do to make up for lost time; instead, he brought trouble, danger and visceral violence hot on his heels.

As a criminal for most of his life, Nate was no stranger to difficult predicaments, especially when he finds himself just before his release out of jail, faced with an irrefusable demand to work for a violent and widely powerful white supremacist organization, Aryan Steel. But, when Nate refuses with a shiv to the neck of the brother of the leader of Aryan Steel, he consequently finds himself, his ex and young daughter on a hit list. Compelled into an intense race against time and the treacherous, as well as forced to use any means necessary to ensure his and daughter Polly’s survival, he instructs his daughter in life lessons that no young girl should ever have to experience. Additionally, to further complicate matters, father and daughter are basically strangers and polar opposites causing personality clashes and breathtaking moments as the two have to learn to accept each other for the sake of their own survival.

Night Watch: A Novel (Kendra Michaels) by Iris Johansen and Roy Johansen

Reviewed by Allen Hott

Night WatchI have to believe this was written mostly by Roy Johansen, the son of Iris Johansen because of all of her books that I have read she has never gone into sex as part of the story.

Click Here for More Information on Night Watch

This one begins to at one point but then, thankfully, backs off of it and goes ahead telling the story without that element. Good job!

Like some of her other books though it does border a bit on the occult or at least on things that are not truly in our element yet. This one gets into the possibility of regenerating parts of the human body. Kendra Michaels was blind from birth but had her sight restored in a special maneuver by Doctor Charles Waldridge. In growing up without sight she with the help of her mother really built her other senses to where she has remarkable talents such as memory. She also has the uncanny ability to connect things about people and their habits, abilities, and their thinking potential. She can also place where people have been by seeing things on their shoes or clothes that they may have come into contact with such as sand or pieces of grass. Her use of all her mental facilities far exceeds anyone else in the world.

In the Time of Bobby Cox: The Atlanta Braves, Their Manager, My Couch, Two Decades, and Me by Lang Whitaker

Reviewed by Allen Hott

In the Time of Bobby CoxThis is a pretty interesting book especially if you happen to be a baseball fan and precisely an Atlanta Braves fan. Basically Whitaker has told the story of Bobby Cox and his journey as manager of the Braves through the most exciting period of baseball in Atlanta history. Whether or not you are a baseball fan I am pretty sure everyone knows of the tremendous run the Braves had from 1991 forward. They won 14 division titles in a row which is something that had never been done and has not been done since by any major league ball club.

Click Here for More Information on In the Time of Bobby Cox

Many believe that Bobby Cox was the catalyst for that impressive showing and it is probably pretty much true as is explained by Whitaker. However it was done it was quite a feat. Cox appeared to handle the players in such a way as to get
the most out of each of them as is described in the book. He treated each individually as best suited them and the team.

And that was quite an array of top flight players as it turned out. The author describes how Gregg Maddox came to the Braves and for the next ten years was one of the best pitchers in baseball. The incident when Maddox first joined the
Braves and how he and David Justice “collided” (actually in a nice way) is a neat piece by itself. He also gives interesting anecdotes about Tom Glavine, John Smoltz, and others. Each of his pieces go together to make this an interesting read.
`
Each of the top players basically gets a chapter or more and then he briefly discusses the entire listing of all the players who played under Cox during his reign. All of these pieces make up, for a real baseball fan, a very enlightening read.

The author does quite a bit of discussing his own life and how he has always been a huge sports fan. And using that as a starter is how he eventually became a journalist and then honed in on sports from that beginning. He played sports all of his young life and has followed all sports throughout his career. He also talks in detail about his living in New York City while working and yet he still constantly did and does follow the Braves.

He has woven an interesting book that zeroes in on Bobby Cox but expands in a fashion to do a great job of keeping the reader’s interest in other players and also shows a good look at life as a sports journalist. Excellent job!

The Himalayan Codex: An R. J. MacCready Novel by Bill Schutt and J.R. Finch

Reviewed by Caryn St. Clair

The himlayan CodexDo you believe in Big Foot? Even if you don’t, do you wish he existed? The search for the Yeti is the focus of The Himalayan Codex and might just be the Summer book for you.

R.J. MacCready is a zoologist and an adventurer who specializes in studying the oddities of nature, so it was a natural fit for him to be sent to Tibet to investigate the discovery of some Mammoth bones. But that wasn’t the true reason for his trip. There was an ancient document that led some to believe that there was a race of humans who were in reality the Yeti of lore.

MacCready’s job was to search for these people or at least evidence that they had in fact existed. This race supposedly held the secret to highly sought after information on human evolution. What he found was alarming.