INTERVIEW WITH SCOTT TUROW

   AUTHOR'S WEBSITE:  http://www.scottturow.com/

       JANUARY 5, 2003

From all the books you have written, do you have a favorite?

NO.  I WOULD FIND IT LIKE NAMING A FAVORITE CHILD.

At what point in time did you realize that writing was "the thing for you"?

FROM THE TIME I WAS 11 OR 12 I WANTED TO BE A NOVELIST.

What advice would you give to someone interested in becoming a writer?

JUST DO IT.  DON'T TALK ABOUT IT, OR THINK ABOUT IT, OR READ ABOUT IT.
STARTING LOGGING PAGES.  YOU HAVE TO PRACTICE THIS LIKE EVERYTHING ELSE.

What is the name of your favorite mystery movie?

A LOT OF CANDIDATES.  USUAL SUSPECTS AND BODY HEAT COME TO MIND FIRST.

What other authors do you enjoy reading?

MANY MANY.  RUTH RENDELL IS ONE OF THE GREATS.

What other types of jobs have you had?

LAWYER, OF COURSE. COLLEGE TEACHER.  MAILMAN.  FACTORY WORKER.

Is there anyone, in particular, who influenced you?

TILLIE OLSEN WAS A GREAT TEACHER TO ME.

What led you to write mysteries?

I BEGAN TO FEEL THAT THE REALIST NOVEL HAD LOST ITS ROOTS IN PLOT.

Do you read reviews of your books?

SOMETIMES

                                              ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Scott Turow, is an attorney and an author. Mr. Turow's first book, One L, about his experience as a first-year student at Harvard Law School, was published in 1977. Ten years later, he achieved a life-long ambition, with the publication of his first novel, Presumed Innocent, followed by The Burden of Proof and Pleading Guilty. His fourth novel, The Laws of Our Fathers, was published in 1996. His latest novel, Personal Injuries, was published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in October, 1999. Mr. Turow's books have been translated into more than 20 languages and, in total, have sold approximately twenty-five million copies worldwide. They have won a number of literary awards. FSG will publish his new novel, Reversible Errors, November 1, 2002.
Mr. Turow continues to work as an attorney. He is a partner in the Chicago office of Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, a national law firm with 600 lawyers. Mr. Turow's practice centers on white collar criminal litigation. Mr. Turow devotes a substantial part of his practice now to pro bono work, including representations in cases involving the death penalty. In one of these matters, Alejandro Hernandez, co-defendant of Rolando Cruz, was exonerated after 11 years in prison.
Scott Turow was born on April 12, 1949 in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated with high honors from Amherst College in 1970. That year, he received an Edith Mirrielees Fellowship to the Stanford University Creative Writing Center, which he attended from 1970-72. From 1972 to 1975, Mr. Turow taught Creative Writing at Stanford, as E.H. Jones Lecturer. In 1975, he entered Harvard Law School, graduating with honors in 1978. From 1978 to 1986, he was an Assistant United States Attorney in Chicago. He was one of the prosecutors in the trial of Illinois Attorney General William J. Scott, who was convicted of tax fraud. Mr. Turow was also lead government counsel in a number of the trials connected to Operation Greylord, a federal investigation of corruption in the Illinois judiciary. Mr. Turow has been active in a number of charitable causes, including Literacy Chicago. In 1997-98,
he served as president of the Authors Guild, which is the national membership organization for professional writers, and continues to serve on its governing board.
Mr. Turow has been appointed to a number of public bodies. He served
as one of the fourteen members of the Commission appointed in March, 2000, by Illinois Governor George Ryan to consider reform of the capital punishment system; the Commission was appointed after Governor Ryan declared a Moratorium on executions and delivered its report in April 2002. Mr. Turow is also a member of the Illinois State Police Merit Board, which determines matters of hiring, promotion and discipline for members of the Illinois State Police. He also has served in 1997 and 1998 on the United States Senate Nominations Commission for the Northern District of Illinois, which recommended appointment of federal judges.
Mr. Turow has been married to Annette Turow, a painter, since 1971. They have three children. The family lives outside Chicago.