No Cure for Love: A Novel by Peter Robinson


Reviewed by Caryn St. Clair

No Cure for LoveSally Bolton left her home in England and came to America. Before long, she had become a groupie of a rock band, and was heavily into drugs and booze. She was more or less the band leader’s gal, but he had others as well-as did she. But then, one frightening incident sent her running. She hopped in a cab and landed at the home of the only “normal” person she knew in the United States. Her friend saw to it that she went into treatment and Sally came out a new person. Literally. As No Cure for Love opens, Sally is now Sarah Broughton, star of a television cop show. She is also getting creepy anonymous letters. Her agent contacts Detective Arvo Hughes of the LAPD’s Threat Management Unit to look into the letters. What follows is a well plotted, suspenseful and more than a little creepy book of cat and mouse. The point of view shifts from Sarah in the present to Sally in the past to her stalker giving readers just tiny peeks into Sally’s past while watching the stalker get closer and closer to Sarah. Will something in the notes help Sarah figure out who her stalker is? Will Detective Hughes unravel the puzzle of Sally’s past in time? Or will the stalker get tired of the game and act?

Click Here for More Information on No Cure for Love

Peter Robinson is best known for his long running Alan Banks series. Being a fan who as of late has grown a bit weary of the lengthy passages while Banks ponders life in the more recent books, I was hoping that No Cure for Love, a departure from the series, would be a return to the Robinson I loved. Well readers, it is and it isn’t.

No Cure for Love could be a refreshing start to an entirely different series. Set in America, specifically Los Angeles, and featuring an LA cop who is a member of the Threat Management Unit as a protagonist, is a fresh idea that could go far. Robinson certainly has gotten the LA scene right. And readers tend to gobble up books set in and around Hollywood. He has a bit of a built in market as well since Michael Connelly contributed a very encouraging forward to the book. If an author wants to sell a police procedural based in LA, he can’t do better than having Connelly in his corner. But the book is a reprint of a book first published under the same title in Canada in 1995. Hmmm. So what does this mean? Is it just that, a reissue? Or is this reissue being used to launch a new series? I’m hoping that No Cure for Love isn’t just a one time reprint, but rather it’s reissue is to launch a new series. I’d like to see what sort of case Detective Hughes takes on next.

I was sent a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.


Leave a Reply