Daily Archives: September 22, 2011

The Good, The Bad and The Murderous by Chester D. Campbell

The Good, The Bad and The MurderousReviewed by Patricia Reid

At the request of Jaz LeMieux, private investigator Sid Chance agrees to help Djuan Burden, who is accused of murder. Djuan’s grandmother is a long time friend of Jaz’s live-in housekeeper, Marie Wallace. Djuan has only been out of jail for about six months and now he is back in jail on a murder charge. His grandmother is convinced that he is innocent and Jaz wants to do everything she can to help a friend of Marie’s.

Jaz is an ex-cop and wealthy business owner but enjoys being a sidekick on Sid’s investigations. When the two visit Djuan’s grandmother, they discover that Djuan went to a small medical equipment store in Nashville’s Green Hills section. The purpose of his visit was to complain about charges on his grandmother’s Medicare account. Djuan’s grandmother, Rachel Ransom, had not paid a lot of attention to the many notices she received from Medicare but when Djuan saw that she had been charged for items such as a power wheelchair he decided to complain. Rachel has never owned a wheel chair and has no need of one. When Djuan went to the equipment store to complain, he found a dead man behind the desk. Frightened that he would be accused of murder because of his prison history, he ran. A witness spotted Djuan leaving the scene of the crime and the police immediately charged him with murder. A crooked cop who had no qualms about planting evidence didn’t help Djuan’s case one bit.

Besides trying to assist Sid in the murder investigation Jaz was also dealing with a problem of her own. Jaz’ company has been accused of racial discrimination. There was no basis for the accusation, but the fact that it had been made brought about a lot of bad publicity for Jaz and her company.

Nowhere to Run by C.J.Box

Nowhere to RunReviewed by Allen Hott

Wyoming forest Ranger Joe Pickett is up to his neck in problems in Nowhere to Run and those problems follow him all the way to the end of the book. C. J. Box writes about Pickett quite often and in this instance some of the happenings are somewhat based on a true story that occurred to a game warden in Wyoming.

In all of his stories Box has Pickett always in some sort of trouble with the higher-ups in his organization but though he sometimes steps a little out of bounds in fulfilling his tasks he is renowned for being able to solve problems. And Pickett has one ace up his sleeve most of the time as the governor of Wyoming really does appreciate Pickett’s work although the governor also sometimes gets up tight with his questionable maneuvering in solving problems.

Pickett has been somewhat isolated in some of the far reaches of the state and is finishing up his last week in this assignment prior to his new assignment back closer to home. Because of several odd incidents he has decided to make a last full swing through one of the highest and most desolate sections of Wyoming. One of the main reasons is that there was a woman runner who was training in the area about a year ago and she turned up missing. Just recently Pickett had been talking with a local resident who told him that there were strange goings on happening in the mountainous area. He claimed that folks were having windows of cars broken, cabins broken in, and tents getting slashed. Also just recently two hunters who had wounded an elk found that it had been butchered and the bulk of the meat stolen when they found the remains after tracking the animal.

Murder in the 11th House by Mitchell Scott Lewis

Murder in the 11th HouseReviewed by Patricia Reid

David Lowell is not your run of the mill detective. David is an astrological detective and is very good at his job. David has studied astrology and has become such an expert that he has used his knowledge of to buy and sell in the stock market and is now a wealthy man.

When Lowell is asked to use his skills to prove the innocence of Johnny Colbert, a woman accused of murdering Farrah Winston, a Judge in the Debit Claims Court in Lower Manhattan, Lowell’s first inclination is to decline. The fact that Johnny Colbert is represented by Melinda Lowell, David Lowell’s daughter, is a convincing enough fact to make him take the case.

Johnny proves to be loud-mouthed and a rather rough person on the exterior but further investigation proves that there is a lot more to her than meets the eye. When Johnny is attacked in the jail Melinda talks her father into posting bail and letting Johnny stay in his townhouse. Lowell is not too pleased with this arrangement but tends to do most anything his daughter asks.