FEATURED BOOKS AT BESTSELLERSWORLD.COM

Blood Relations

Blood Relations by Edward Cohen and Kathy Cohen

To purchase this book click on the links below: Amazon.com Read Our Review More »

Game Piece

Game Piece by Alan Brenham

To purchase this book click on the link below: Amazon.com Read Our Review More »

Murder,She Wrote: Manuscript for Murder

Murder, She Wrote: Manuscript for Murder by Jessica Fletcher & Jon Land

To purchase this book click on the link below: Amazon.com Read Our Review More »

BOO! A Chilling Tale of Too-Too #MeToo by Simon Plaster

To purchase this book click on the links below: Amazon.com Read Our Review More »

Blood Relations by Edward Cohen and Kathy Cohen

Reviewed by Lisa Brown-Gilbert

Blood RelationsA twisted legal thriller which satisfies with as much grit as it does with intrigue, Blood Relations by co-authors Kathy Cohen and Edward Cohen keeps you rapt and wound tight till its shocking ending.

Absolutely worth the read, this legal thriller brings readers to the hot and steamy locale of New Orleans, where behind the closed doors of the selective Cameron and Munger law firm, things turn out to be just as hot and even steamier. And when young Kyle Cameron accidentally discovers his father’s infidelitous relationship with sexy femme fatale co-worker, lawyer Laura Niles, he aims to entice his father’s love interest away. However, things take a turn for the horrific when Laura Niles is found murdered and Jake –Kyle’s father–winds up in the center of a circumstantial whirlwind of evidence that could destroy his career, marriage and even his life. Facing jail or execution, Jake has no choice but to trust his ne’er-do-well son and lawyer, Kyle, trying the case that would make or break him.

Game Piece by Alan Brenham

Reviewed by Dianne Woodman

Game PieceGame Piece is a gripping and heart-pounding thriller, which keeps readers glued to the pages right through to a spine-chilling conclusion. Short chapters give a fast-moving rhythm to the story line and add more excitement to this crime thriller without it feeling choppy or fragmented.

Barry Marshall, a police detective in Temple, Texas, is a self-described workaholic. When Marshall checks out an anonymous lead involving one of his open cases, he discovers a gruesome murder scene. This is only the beginning of a string of murders committed by a killer who appears to have a personal vendetta against Marshall for some inscrutable reason. The two men engage in a deadly cat-and-mouse game. As the game progresses, the stakes escalate for Barry with an unanticipated effect on his career and family. Can Barry end the perpetrator’s reign of terror before his convoluted scheme succeeds?

Trepidation and conflict have been ramped up by Alan Brenham’s excellent handling of not only the multiple points of view but also the transitions between point of view characters. The majority of the story is told from Barry’s viewpoint. However, the third-person point of view provides an added dimension to the story allowing readers to understand the thoughts and motivations of other characters who play an important role.

Murder, She Wrote: Manuscript for Murder by Jessica Fletcher and Jon Land

Reviewed by Russell Ilg

Manuscript for Murder

“What’s the most fun you’ve ever had killing someone?”

So opens Manuscript for Murder, the second Murder, She Wrote mystery to be penned by Jon Land and lofty forty-eighth overall, placing the series in rarified air indeed. And rightfully so, given Jessica Fletcher’s status as undeniably America’s most famous sleuth. While the fabulously successful television show starring Angela Lansbury is primarily to blame for that, Land seems determined to have the books leave their own indelible mark on pop culture.

And he takes a great step toward just that end with Manuscript for Murder, a tale that adds thriller elements to already savory mind snack mix that features a more sharply seasoned Jessica herself. She’s got a bit of an edge now and so does this scintillating series entry that bears some resemblance to Umberto Ecco’s The Name of the Rose and, especially, to the great Roman Polanski film The Ghost Writer.

That’s because Manuscript for Murder focuses on just that: a book that kills. Not literally, of course, but close enough given that anyone who reads the manuscript dies, including Jessica’s longtime publisher Lane Barfield who sees the book within a book as the next Da Vinci Code that can restore him to publishing relevance. Not being one to take the murder of friends lightly, Jessica takes up the case, only to find herself marked as the next victim.

Old-school fans of the book series might raise their eyebrows at the thought of incorporating such thrills and spills into the narrative. But Land doesn’t so much reinvent the cozy formula as tweak it a bit. Cabot Cove is still Cabot Cove and the tried and true cast of recurring characters are well represented from Sheriff Mort Metzger to Dr. Seth Hazlitt to private eye Harry McGraw. Land’s dialogue hums with more rapid and pointed exchanges, true more actually to the spirit of the television show than the voluminous series of books that predated his involvement.

BOO! A Chilling Tale of Too-Too #MeToo by Simon Plaster

Reviewed by Douglas R. Cobb

BooBOO! by Simon Plaster, featuring a cast of some of the most idiosyncratic and humorously twisted characters this side of Oklahoma City, along with his memorable female protagonist, small town reporter turned big, Henrietta, just might be one of the author’s most entertaining and LOL novels yet. In BOO!, Plaster’s latest novel, the author takes satirical jabs at a variety of subjects, including sexual mores and the “Me Too” movement. It’s a book that will delight fans of Plaster’s and anybody who enjoys reading satirical novels that point out the lighter side of controversial topics. No matter if you’re a supporter of the “Me Too” movement or a critic of it, you’ll find something to laugh and think about in the pages of BOO!

As BOO! opens, Henrietta is working in OKC writing for the OKC SCENE, and she has a new boss, Mr. Nigel Fleetwood, a man who wants to take the publication in a new direction. Affecting an English accent, Fleetwood wants the OKC SCENE to incorporate touches that have long been staples of certain UK newspapers, like including more scandalous stories about celebrities and political figures, along with photographs of naked or semi-clothed ladies.

Henrietta’s boss requests that she writes a story for the OKC SCENE about haunted houses in Oklahoma. During her research online, she reads about a haunted castle known as LeRoy’s Castle that is open to the public and features “‘almost live’ entertainment.” The Haunted Castle is beset with all sorts of rumors associated with it. When Henrietta learns that the famous Hollywood producer/director Deano DeBoffo, a character who Plaster has incorporated in past novels in the series, plans to be there soon, she senses the makings of a good news story.

Let These Bones Live Again (A Christopher Worthy/Father Fortis Mystery) (Volume 3) by David Carlson

Reviewed by Jud Hanson

Let These Bones Live AgainAllyson Worthy is a criminology student is finally checking off a major item on her bucket list: visiting the city of Venice, Italy. She’s obtained an internship with the Venice police to help catalog non-violent crimes against foreigners. However, when she gets there, her assignment changes to one of investigating some mysterious deaths. Simultaneously, family friend Father Nicholas Fortis has been asked by the Vatican to help investigate the theft of relics from Venetian churches. Neither one knows that their two separate investigations will soon collide.

House of Rose (A Magic City Story Book 1) by T.J. Thorne

Reviewed by Ed Kelly

House of RoseHouse of Rose is a genre–bending novel–part police procedural, part romance, part mystery, and part witch/magic story. Sometimes it’s difficult to keep storylines straight, but for those who like multi dimensional tales, this book fits the bill.

As the plot is complicated, the characters seem less so, except for the main character, Rose. Rose is a new graduate of the Birmingham, Alabama Police Academy, a rookie cop. She has a lonely past: she was orphaned by the violent death of her entire family, mother, father, and sister. She alone escapes the deadly fire, which we come to find out was arson. Rose was placed in an orphanage and adopted by a loving family, but it was not her family.

While she is good looking, Rose does nothing to enhance her beauty; she constantly wears jeans and tee shirts to deflect attention from herself. She’s standoffish, not social, has no friends, and has little interest in men, at least up to the present time. Rose is a definite loner. Sometimes it is difficult to appreciate Rose as she treats people roughly, because of her lack of social grace and skill.

Beneath a Scarlet Sky: A Novel by Mark Sullivan

Reviewed by Allen Hott

Beneath a Scarlet SkyThis is a really great read. It is the story of a young Italian boy, Pimo Lella, who while growing up in Italy during the World War II Invasion by the Nazis lives quite a life. And one of the most interesting parts is that Pimo is a real life person and the story is his true story.

There were many Italians who were upset with the Nazi takeover of Italy and most of them fought against that takeover in their own way. The Lella family was one group that did all they could by working as a spy network and even used a radio to transmit information that was hurtful to the German army.

However perhaps their biggest achievement was raising Pimo to be one of Italy’s best spies. He started as a guide when he would help people get out of the country by taking them up into the mountains. There they were helped by a catholic priest, Father Luigi Re, who offered a sanctuary to those fleeing and helped them get into Switzerland, a neutral country. Those journeys are an interesting part of the story.

When he got to the age he was going to have to enlist in the ORG.TODT which was a branch of the German army that Italians served in. Pimo fought hard against it but was convinced by his family that it was the safest thing for him to do and that they had plans for him to help in their spy network.

Shortly after joining and getting out of boot camp he was summoned by a German general who had seen him repair the General’s automobile when the driver couldn’t do it. General Leyers immediately told Pimo that he was to report to headquarters the next morning to become his driver! Pimo’s family was thrilled because they knew with Pimo’s skills and hatred of the Germans he would be an important part of their spy network from a great spot. General Leyers was one of the highest ranking officers of the German army and actually was close to Adolf Hitler

The story than goes on and tells the true story of how Pimo works as a spy while driving the General all over that part of Europe. He is able to get lot of information back to his family about German troop movements and even some of their planned invasions of other areas.

While the war continues Pimo because of his closeness to the General not only meets Mussolini but many other high German officials. And he also meets the love of his life, Anna! Anna works as a maid for Leyer’s Italian girlfriend and Anna and Pimo within a short period of time fall in love.

There is much more to this great story and how this Italian boy who grew into a freedom fighter for the Italians lived his life. It is not all peaches and cream as there are some very sad moments in the book but it is still a great read. To the best of my knowledge Pimo is still alive at 93 and lives in Italy.

War of the Wolf: A Novel (Saxton Tales Book 11) by Bernard Cornwell

Reviewed by Teri Davis

War of the WolfHow could anyone teach about life in the late 900s or early 1000 A.D.? The time of Saxons, Mercians, Danes all battling over land that would become England. Along side the land issue is the decision of religion. Christianity is being followed by most of the inhabitants while the many of the Danes hold on to their beliefs and loyalties to the Norse Gods. Naturally, among each side are inner battles of ambitious rulers fighting and acquiring loyalties for power and possessions.

War of the Wolf is the eleventh book in Bernard Cornwell’s Saxon series explaining how England became a single country. All of these books feature Uhtred, who in my mind resembles one of the larger fighting men in Game of Thrones with numerous scars and battle wounds from constant altercations.

War of the Wolf is seen through the eyes of Uhtred, now an older and wiser man. In the first book, I viewed him with distaste as his taste of fighting seemed impulsive. Throughout the series, Uhtred grows more interlining from his experiences and challenges so that now he thinks, plots, and attempts to outwit his enemy. Now, it is easier to see Uhtred as wise and even caring and protective of his friends, allies, and family.

Uhtred now has reestablished his life in his northern family home of Bebbanburg which took many years. He is comfortable in his northern home and would rather be home than fighting. He realizes that even though home, peace is always temporary with the constant threat of the Viking invaders, the wild fighting Scots from the northern lands and the battling for power from the Mercians, now in control of England.

Uhtred is summoned to King Edward in Wessex to decide the next king whether through oldest illegitimate sons, legitimate heirs, or other lesser leaders. Uhtred has no intention of going until he discovers the problems of his son-in-law. The needs and vengeances of the family outweigh the dangers.

In War of the Wolf, Uhtred proves his leadership and acquired wisdom in this battle of kings as well as a new challenger proves a threat to him, his family, and his ancestral homeland. His skills or lack of skills in this new world of diplomacy as well as his strategic fighting abilities demonstrates that peace is never permanent. There is always a new, younger, stronger, and perhaps smarter challenger.

War of the Wolf is thoroughly enthralling as Uhtred enters of a world of constant change.

For a reader unfamiliar with this series, I would strongly recommend to read at least the first book or to watch the television series The Last Kingdom before this particular novel. Being acquainted with the characters, especially the names is extremely helpful as well as understanding the people. Personally, I enjoy how each person matures and their previous life choices affecting their life in this eleventh book.

How could anyone learn of life in the 900s and 1000 A.D. in England. Read the Saxon series by Bernard Cornwell. Bernard Cornwell is a master storyteller with this newest book in the Saxon series, War of the Wolf.

The Frame-Up (The Golden Arrow Mysteries) by Meghan Scott Molin

Reviewed by Ed Kelly

The Frame-UpFor readers of Stephanie Plum, the character of MG (Michael-Grace), is the perfect sister. But MG is light years from Steph in geekhood, she is the queen of nerdiness, bar none. This novel is not just for geeks and nerds, it’s also for those of us who nothing about them and their culture. Given the strength of MG’s character and by seeing everything through her eyes, MG will guide us through all the curves and tunnels of this alien world. Granted you’ll have to google a few items (Assassin’s Creed, Jigglypuff, for example), but you’ll grow to trust MG as your guide.

Who is MG? She’s a law school dropout, against her parent’s wishes. MG rebelled even further from her parents (and everyone else from the non-nerd world) and became a comic story writer, comic book illustrator, and a costume designer. Her hair has been many colors: blue, violet, green, orange, and other colors as well. Her love for the nerd culture has been her life as can be seen in the following bio bit: “The comic book store I worked in when I turned sixteen was the first places that had ever felt like home. . . .I loved the stack of adventures waiting to be read and the conversation about Falcon and Swish I had with customers. . . .” And she’s managed to work in that world for ten years successfully.

Holy Ghost (A Virgil Flowers Novel) by John Sandford

Reviewed by Allen Hott

Holy GhostWheatfield, Minnesota is hardly the place that you would expect a very interesting murder mystery to be written about. But that is exactly where John Sandford put Virgil Flowers to solve his next case. Seems as though someone has decided to shoot a long range rife at folks and in so doing several people have been wounded as they stood around the town center watching an apparition of the Virgin Mary. Some folks are not happy with the arrival of the apparition but others believe not only is it a good sign for their religion but it also is giving the town a boost as far as tourism, etc.

Once Virgil gets to town he gets pretty well introduced to all the main players in the town. Seems as though two guys, Skinner and Holland, own the most important place called Skinner & Holland, Eats & Souvenirs. Holland is also the mayor and though Skinner is just seventeen it appears he is an important person in the town (and with the ladies) mainly because of his intelligence which is extremely high.

The Midnight Line: A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child

Reviewed by Allen Hott

The Midnight LineJack Reacher, the former West Pointer and retired MP Major, Is off on another of his journeys. Since retiring from the service Reacher and his toothbrush have traveled all over the United States and he isn’t done yet. Yes that is right about his toothbrush. That is all he carries with him. He has no mechanical means of transportation like an automobile, no suitcase because he carries no clothes, and no, not even a telephone. It is just him and his toothbrush. Oh I almost forgot. He does carry a wallet so he can go to a bank on occasion and get a few dollars to spend. But other than that nothing!

He basically travels by use of his feet or a bus or his thumb. He normally walks or hitchhikes wherever he goes. And he does travel both north and south across the United States. This time after he left Milwaukee by bus he had gotten off at a rest stop and was just walking around when he passed a pawn shop. In the window was a class ring from West Point Class 2005. He was especially caught by the size because it was very small. When the proprietor at first declines to give him immediate information as to who left the ring, Reacher abruptly tells the bus driver to go on as he is going to dig deeper into this anomaly.

Fractured by Karin Slaughter

Reviewed by Allen Hott

FracturedQuite a story that illustrates not only how cops work but also how criminal minds work while they are plotting some of the terrible crimes that they perpetrate.

It begins with the Campano family being pretty well torn apart when the mother comes upon a crime scene and sees what she believes to be her daughter, Emma, in a horrible condition with a young man hovering over the girl. The mother, with tremendous force powered by her feelings for her daughter, overtakes the man and stabs him to death.

When the police come on the scene they find that the girl was not her daughter and the man was not the assailant! It turns out that the young man was a boyfriend of her daughter. He had earlier come into the house looking for the daughter, his girlfriend.

Where Dragonwoofs Sleep and the Fading Creeps by A.J. Massey

Reviewed by Diane Pollock

The snow burns! Ben has slipped into another world in his sleep, a very odd and magical world indeed. Fairies are mean, snow is hot, humans are referred to as weeds and the whole place is fading away. He embarks on a quest to save this land and meets fellow weeds along the way, as well as a myriad of other fascinating creatures.

Reminiscent of the Oz books, this land is peopled with creatures that are at once familiar and strange, like dragonwoofs. Small dragons that are very doglike in their devotion and culinary tastes! Friendly robots, cruel fairies, translucent elves and more.